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Br J Clin Psychol. 2004 Sep;43(Pt 3):299-311.

The role of body objectification in disordered eating and depressed mood.

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  • 1School of Psychology, Flinders University of South Australia, Australia. Marika.Tiggemann@flinders.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The study aimed to extend tests of objectification theory into the realm of depression. The theory's applicability to men was also investigated.

DESIGN:

A cross-sectional study.

METHOD:

A sample of 115 men and 171 women completed questionnaire measures of self-objectification, depressed mood, disordered eating, as well as the proposed mediating variables of body shame, appearance anxiety, flow and awareness of internal states.

RESULTS:

For women, it was found that depressed mood and disordered eating were both predicted by self-objectification and its corollary of habitual self-surveillance. Path analysis gave strong support to the mediational relationships of the theoretical model. With one major exception (the role of self-objectification), the pattern of relationships was similar for men.

CONCLUSION:

Objectification theory provides a useful framework for identifying predictors of depressed mood.

Copyright 2004 The British Psychological Society

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