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Clin Infect Dis. 2004 Jul 15;39(2):233-9. Epub 2004 Jun 25.

Vaccine development to prevent cytomegalovirus disease: report from the National Vaccine Advisory Committee.

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  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. aarvin@stanford.edu

Abstract

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most common intrauterine infection in the United States, and it exacts a heavy toll when it infects children and immunocompromised individuals. A CMV vaccine was assigned the highest priority by the Institute of Medicine in its 1999 assessment of targets for vaccine development. The priority was based on the cost and human suffering that would be alleviated by reducing the disease burden of congenital CMV infection. The National Vaccine Advisory Committee and invited experts examined the prospects for a CMV vaccine and the actions needed to bring about successful vaccine development at a National Vaccine Program Office workshop in October 2000. This article summarizes information about the changing epidemiology of CMV and immune responses to infection and immunity, and it reviews the current status of several vaccine candidates. Support of government agencies for CMV vaccine research and development is critical to address this need.

PMID:
15307033
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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