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Oncogene. 2004 Sep 9;23(41):6924-32.

Inhibitory effects of cyclosporin A on calcium mobilization-dependent interleukin-8 expression and invasive potential of human glioblastoma U251MG cells.

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  • 1Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Division of Molecular and Cellular Adaptation, Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601, Japan.

Abstract

Interleukin (IL)-8 produced from glioblastoma is suggested to contribute to its own proliferation and progression. Since various external stimuli have been shown to increase intracellular Ca(2+) in glioma cells, we investigated Ca(2+) mobilization-dependent IL-8 expression and effect of cyclosporin A (CsA), an inhibitor of calcineurin (Cn), on the expression and invasive potential of human glioblastoma U251MG cells. Combined treatment with Ca(2+)-ionophore and phorbol-myristate-acetate (A23187/PMA) increased IL-8 mRNA and protein levels. This increase was suppressed by CsA and by another Cn inhibitor FK506. Luciferase reporter gene assay and electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that activation of p65-containing nuclear factor-kappaB was essential for A23187/PMA-dependent activation of IL-8 promoter. CsA suppressed the promoter activity by attenuating IkappaB-alpha degradation. U251MG cells expressed IL-8 receptors CXCR-1 and -2, and Matrigel invasion assay revealed that CsA attenuated A23187/PMA-dependent stimulation of invasive potential, probably by inhibiting IL-8 production. In addition, IL-8-dependent proliferation was also suppressed by CsA. Taken together, these results demonstrate the novel inhibitory effects of CsA on glioblastoma cell functions, suggesting CsA as a potential therapeutic adjuvant for glioma treatment.

PMID:
15286717
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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