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Mod Pathol. 2004 Dec;17(12):1455-63.

CD10 is expressed in a subset of chromophobe renal cell carcinomas.

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  • 1Anatomia Patologica, Università di Sassari, Sassari, Italy. guidomart@yahoo.com

Abstract

CD10 has been considered a useful marker in the diagnosis of renal carcinomas, because of its expression in clear cell and papillary renal cell carcinomas and its absence in chromophobe renal cell carcinomas. On the other hand, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma expresses parvalbumin, which is absent in clear cell and papillary renal cell carcinomas. To further address the relevance of these markers, we studied the expression of CD10 and parvalbumin in 42 samples of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (seven of which had aggressive features, including invasion beyond the renal capsule, renal vein invasion, metastases, or sarcomatoid transformation), 75 clear cell renal cell carcinomas (eight metastatic) and 51 papillary renal cell carcinomas (two metastatic). CD10 was found in 100% of clear cell renal cell carcinomas, 63% of papillary renal cell carcinomas and in all metastatic cases of both types. At variance with previous studies, we found CD10 expression in from 30 to 90% of the neoplastic cells, in 11 of 42 (26%) chromophobe renal cell carcinomas. The CD10-positive cases included five of the seven (71%) chromophobe renal cell carcinoma with aggressive features. Statistical analysis showed significant association of CD10-positive tumors with clinicopathologic aggressiveness (P=0.003) and mitotic figures (P=0.04). Parvalbumin was strongly expressed in all primary and metastatic chromophobe renal cell carcinomas. Western blot analysis was utilized to confirm the expression of both CD10 and parvalbumin in chromophobe renal cell carcinomas.

PMID:
15286660
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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