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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Jun;190(6):1739-43; discussion 1744-6.

Factors impacting injury documentation after sexual assault: role of examiner experience and gender.

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  • 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study was undertaken to determine whether physician gender or level of experience is associated with the prevalence of trauma documented in victims after sexual assault.

STUDY DESIGN:

All female patients 15 years or older reporting to an urban hospital with a complaint of sexual assault between January 1997 and September 1999 underwent a standardized history and physical examination by a second- or third-year resident in obstetrics and gynecology. Data were abstracted and verified. A chi(2) or Fisher exact test was used for categoric analysis.

RESULTS:

The overall prevalence of genital trauma was 21% in the 662 patients available for analysis. The prevalence of genital trauma documented by second- and third-year residents was 50 of 191 patients (26.2%) and 90 of 471 patients (19.1%), respectively (P=.04), despite similar assault characteristics between the 2 groups. The prevalence of genital trauma documented by male examiners (105/499 [21.0%]) and female examiners (35/160 [21.9%]) did not differ (P=.8). All examiners documented a similar prevalence of body trauma (52%).

CONCLUSION:

This study supports the hypothesis that the examiner's experience level may influence the prevalence of genital trauma documented after a sexual assault. Genital trauma documented was not associated with examiner gender in this study.

PMID:
15284786
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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