Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Thorax. 2004 Aug;59(8):652-6.

Vitamin E supplements in asthma: a parallel group randomised placebo controlled trial.

Author information

  • 1Division of Respiratory Medicine, University of Nottingham, Clinical Science Building, Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham NG5 1PB, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Increased dietary vitamin E intake is associated with a reduced incidence of asthma, and combinations of antioxidant supplements including vitamin E are effective in reducing ozone induced bronchoconstriction. A study was undertaken to investigate the effect of supplementation with vitamin E for 6 weeks on bronchial hyperresponsiveness in atopic adults with asthma.

METHODS:

72 participants from a clinical trial register of adults with asthma were randomised to receive 500 mg natural vitamin E or matched placebo for 6 weeks in a placebo controlled, double blind parallel group clinical trial. Inclusion criteria included age 18-60 years, maintenance treatment of at least one dose of inhaled corticosteroid per day, a positive skin prick test to one of three common allergens, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine (defined as a dose provoking a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) (PD(20)) of 12.25 micromol). Secondary outcomes were FEV(1), forced vital capacity, mean morning and evening peak flow, symptom scores, bronchodilator use, and serum immunoglobulin E levels.

RESULTS:

In the primary intention to treat analysis the change in PD(20) was similar in the vitamin E and placebo groups with a mean difference of +0.25 doubling doses of methacholine (95% confidence interval -0.67 to +1.16 greater with vitamin E). There was no effect of vitamin E supplementation on any other measure of asthma control, either in the intention to treat or per protocol analysis. There was also no effect of vitamin E supplementation on serum immunoglobulin levels.

CONCLUSION:

Dietary supplementation with vitamin E adds no benefit to current standard treatment in adults with mild to moderate asthma.

Comment in

PMID:
15282383
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1747112
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk