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J Hum Hypertens. 2004 Aug;18(8):545-51.

Prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of hypertension in North America, North Africa and Asia.

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  • 1Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA. pwhelton@tulane.edu

Abstract

Results from national surveys of prevalence, awareness, treatment and control provide the most meaningful basis for assessing the burden of hypertension in the community. National surveys conducted in a variety of countries in North America, Europe, Australia, Asia and Africa have identified a strikingly similar relationship between age and blood pressure (BP), with a progressive and steep increase in systolic BP throughout adult life and a less steep increase in diastolic BP from adolescence until the fifth or sixth decade. In most countries surveyed, there was a high prevalence of hypertension. Approximately, one quarter of all adults in the United States and Egypt had hypertension (systolic BP>/=140 mmHg or diastolic BP>/=90 mmHg or use of antihypertensive medication) in national surveys conducted in 1988-1991 and 1991-1993, respectively. The corresponding percentage was somewhat lower (14.4%) for adults surveyed in China during 1991, but temporal trends indicate that the prevalence of hypertension is increasing rapidly in that country. In the 1988-1991 national survey, more than 25% of US adults were unaware of their diagnosis, only 55% were being treated with antihypertensive medication and only 29% were on antihypertensive medication with a systolic/diastolic BP >140/90 mmHg. The situation was much worse in Egypt and China, with only 8% and <5% of adults with hypertension, respectively, being treated with antihypertensive medication and having a systolic/diastolic BP <140/90 mmHg. These survey results underscore the fact that hypertension is highly prevalent, poorly treated and controlled, and an escalating health challenge in economically developing countries.

PMID:
15269704
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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