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Transplantation. 2004 May 27;77(10):1529-34.

Attrition of potential bone marrow donors at two key decision points leading to donation.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medicine, Center for Research on Health Care, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. switzerge@upmc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) has had remarkable success at recruiting potential bone marrow donors and recently has become increasingly focused on the retention of registered volunteers. This study extends the authors' work examining factors associated with attrition from the registry. Its goal was to determine which characteristics from six psychosocial domains were associated with attrition at two key stages leading to donation.

METHODS:

Questionnaires were mailed to potential donors after they were contacted as a potential match and had decided whether or not to continue toward donation. Our final sample included 1,727 volunteers who decided to continue with typing at the DR stage and 195 volunteers who decided to continue at the confirmatory typing (CT) stage as well as 179 and 169 individuals, respectively, who declined further participation in the registry at DR and CT stages.

RESULTS:

Bivariate analyses indicated that multiple factors in all six domains (demographics, volunteer-related, general psychosocial, recruitment-related, donation-related, and contact with center staff) were associated with discontinued registry participation. Logistic regression indicated that unique associations were concentrated in volunteer-related, donation-related, and contact with center domains.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings suggested that intrinsic commitment to donation, more realistic expectations, fewer medical concerns, and greater contact with the donor center were all associated with lower attrition. Possible interventions to reduce attrition are discussed.

PMID:
15239616
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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