Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Genome Res. 2004 Jul;14(7):1268-74.

Gene expression from the aneuploid chromosome in a trisomy mouse model of down syndrome.

Author information

  • 1Department of Genetic Medicine and Development, University of Geneva Medical School and University Hospitals, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland. Robert.Lyle@medicine.unige.ch

Abstract

Trisomy 21 is the prototype of human aneuploidies. Since its discovery in 1959, the hypothesis has been that overexpression of the approximately 230 human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) genes result in the complex phenotype. However, the level of overexpression of Hsa21 genes in trisomic individuals is presently unknown. We have used Taqman real-time quantitative PCR to accurately measure expression of the mouse orthologs of Hsa21 in the partial trisomy mouse model Ts65Dn. The transcript levels of 78 protein-coding genes present in three copies in Ts65Dn and 21 control genes were compared between Ts65Dn and normal mouse littermates. The mean overexpression of the aneuploid genes is very close to the expected 1.5-fold in all six tissues studied. However, only approximately a third of the genes (37%) are expressed at the theoretical value of 1.5-fold. On average, 45% of the genes are expressed at significantly lower than 1.5-fold, and 9% are not significantly different from 1.0. Interestingly, 18% of the aneuploid genes were expressed at levels significantly greater than 1.5-fold. These data provide candidate genes that might be involved in the phenotypes of Down syndrome, and reveal a complex regulation of gene expression that is not only related to gene copy number.

Copyright 2004 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press ISSN

PMID:
15231743
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC442141
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (4)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk