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Int J Clin Oncol. 2004 Jun;9(3):174-8.

Surgical resection deteriorates gemcitabine-induced leukopenia in pancreatic cancer.

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  • 1Department of Pharmacy, Kyoto University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Gemcitabine hydrochloride (GEM) is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents for pancreatic cancer; however, factors affecting GEM-induced leukopenia have not been clarified yet. In the present study, we analyzed the relationship between patients backgrounds and GEM-induced leukopenia.

METHODS:

Thirty-eight patients with pancreatic cancer were analyzed for correlation between the dose of GEM and the blood leukocyte number. Moreover, we compared leukopenia in resected and non-resected patients.

RESULTS:

The incidence of grade 3 or 4 leukopenia was 25% in the non-resected patients, whereas equivalent leukopenia was observed in 57% of the resected patients ( P = 0.048 by the chi(2) test). The relative decrease in blood leukocytes induced by GEM administration was more severe in resected patients (41.3 +/- 9.9%), as compared to non-resected patients (52.6 +/- 16.0%; P = 0.023 by t-test).

CONCLUSION:

In the present study, we found that the administration of GEM to patients after surgical resection caused more severe leukopenia, as compared to findings in non-resected patients. These data suggested that more frequent monitoring of the leukocyte count and prolonged intervals between GEM administrations are necessary for resected patients with pancreatic cancer.Gemcitabine hydrochloride (GEM) is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents for pancreatic cancer; however, factors affecting GEM-induced leukopenia have not been clarified yet. In the present study, we analyzed the relationship between patients' backgrounds and GEM-induced leukopenia.

PMID:
15221601
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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