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J Am Diet Assoc. 2004 Jul;104(7):1120-6.

Girls at risk for overweight at age 5 are at risk for dietary restraint, disinhibited overeating, weight concerns, and greater weight gain from 5 to 9 years.

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  • 1Department of Human Development and Family Studies and the Graduate Program in Nutrition, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The goal of this study was to investigate the emergence of dietary restraint, disinhibited eating, weight concerns, and body dissatisfaction among girls from 5 to 9 years old, and to assess whether girls at risk for overweight at age 5 were at greater risk for the emergence of restraint, disinhibited overeating, weight concerns, and body dissatisfaction.

DESIGN:

Longitudinal data were used to assess the relationship between weight status and the development of dietary restraint, aspects of disinhibited overeating, weight concern, and body dissatisfaction at ages 5, 7, and 9 years.

SUBJECTS:

Participants were 153 girls from predominately middle class and exclusively non-Hispanic white families living in central Pennsylvania. Statistical analyses Differences in weight status, dietary restraint, disinhibition, weight concern, and body dissatisfaction between girls at risk (>85th percentile body mass index) or not at risk for overweight at age 5 were assessed using repeated measures analysis of variance at ages 5, 7, and 9 years.

RESULTS:

Girls who were at risk for overweight at age 5 reported significantly higher levels of restraint, disinhibition, weight concern, and body dissatisfaction by age 9. Girls at risk for overweight at age 5 also showed greater increases in weight status from 5 to 9 years of age.

CONCLUSIONS:

Higher levels of dietary restraint, weight concern, and body dissatisfaction among young girls at risk for overweight were accompanied by greater weight gain from 5 to 9 years of age, consistent with other recent findings suggesting that youths' attempts at weight control may promote weight gain. Positive alternatives to attempts at dietary restriction are essential to promoting healthful weight status among children, and should include encouraging physical activity, promoting children's acceptance of a variety of low-energy-density foods, and providing guides to appropriate portion sizes.

Comment in

PMID:
15215771
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2562311
Free PMC Article
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