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Br J Cancer. 2004 Jul 19;91(2):242-7.

Trends in the usage of adjuvant systemic therapy for breast cancer in the Netherlands and its effect on mortality.

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  • 1Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, and Netherlands Institute for Health Sciences, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Adjuvant systemic therapy was introduced in the Netherlands as a breast cancer treatment in the early 1980s. In this paper, we describe the trends in the usage of adjuvant systemic treatment in the period 1975-1997 in the Netherlands. The main aim of our study was to assess the effects of adjuvant tamoxifen and polychemotherapy on breast cancer mortality, compared to the effects of the mammography screening programme. The computer simulation model MIcrosimulation SCreening ANalysis, which simulates demography, natural history of breast cancer and screening effects, was used to estimate the effects. Use of adjuvant therapy increased over time, but since 1990 it remained rather stable. Nowadays, adjuvant therapy is given to 88% of node-positive patients aged 50-69 years, while less than 10% of node-negative patients receive any kind of adjuvant treatment. Adjuvant treatment is given independent of the mode of detection (adjusted by nodal status and size). We predict that the reduction in breast cancer mortality due to adjuvant therapy is 7% in women aged 55-74 years, while the reduction due to screening, which was first implemented in women aged 50-69 years in 1990-97, will be 28-30% in 2007. In conclusion, although adjuvant systemic therapy can reduce breast cancer mortality rates, it is anticipated to be less than the mortality reduction caused by mammography screening.

PMID:
15213715
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2409826
Free PMC Article

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