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Transplant Proc. 2004 May;36(4):1119-20.

Morbidity associated with intraportal islet transplantation.

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  • 1Department of Surgery, Cell Isolation and Transplantation Center, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Complications associated with intraportal islet infusion have been reported. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between occurrence of complications and islet preparation characteristics/infusion technique.

METHODS:

We reviewed all intraportal islet infusions from 1992 to 2003.

RESULTS:

Sixteen islet autotransplantations were performed without infusion-related complications. The tissue volume injected was 13 +/- 11 mL with basal and peak portal pressures of 13 +/- 6 and 21 +/- 6 mm Hg. Seventy-seven intraportal islet allotransplantations were performed in 51 patients. Fifteen islet infusions were done by laparotomy during simultaneous islet/kidney transplantation without complication. Among 62 percutaneous transhepatic injections, nine complications (two portal branch thrombosis and seven intra-abdominal hemorrhages) were recorded. Rise in portal pressure was related to tissue volume injected (P <.05). Basal and peak portal pressures were 14 +/- 5 and 18 +/- 6 mm Hg in uncomplicated infusions, 14 +/- 9 and 18 +/- 9 mm Hg in the thrombosis group, and 13 +/- 7 and 18 +/- 5 mm Hg in the hemorrhage group (P >.05). Complications occurred only after percutaneous islet infusion (P <.03).

CONCLUSIONS:

Procedure-related morbidity of intraportal islet infusion is low. Changes in portal pressure are related to volume of tissue injected but do not seem to be associated with the occurrence of complications. Percutaneous infusion is a minimally invasive procedure, but this advantage must be balanced by the higher rate of complications.

Comment in

PMID:
15194389
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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