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J Am Coll Nutr. 2004 Jun;23(3):187-96.

Diet as a risk factor for cholesterol gallstone disease.

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  • 1Departmento de Nutrición, Diabetes, y Metabolismo, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.

Abstract

Cholesterol gallstone disease is a common condition in western populations. The etiology is multifactorial with interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Obesity, aging, estrogen treatment, pregnancy and diabetes are consistently associated to a higher risk. A number of dietary factors have been involved in the pathogenesis of cholelithiasis. In this article we summarize several studies that have evaluated the role of diet as a potential risk factor for gallstone formation, including energy intake, cholesterol, fatty acids, fiber, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals, and alcohol intake. Consumption of simple sugars and saturated fat has been mostly associated to a higher risk, while fiber intake and moderate consumption of alcohol, consistently reduce the risk. The association between cholesterol intake and gallstone disease has been variable in different studies. The effects of other dietary factors are less conclusive; additional studies are therefore necessary to clarify their relevance in the pathogenesis of gallstone disease. Recent discoveries of the role of orphan nuclear receptors in the regulation of fatty acid and hepatic cholesterol metabolism and excretion open new perspectives for a better understanding of the role of dietary constituents on cholesterol gallstone formation. KEY TEACHING POINTS: The etiology of cholesterol gallstone disease is multifactorial with interaction between genome and environment. It has been postulated that dietary constituents are important determinants for the formation of lithogenic bile. Intake of high energy, simple sugar and saturated fat favors gallstone formation. Fiber and moderate consumption of alcohol reduce the risk. The role of orphan nuclear receptors in the regulation of hepatic cholesterol metabolism and excretion open new leads for understanding the role of dietary constituents on cholesterol gallstone formation.

PMID:
15190042
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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