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Br J Cancer. 2004 Jul 19;91(2):237-41.

Primary breast sarcoma: clinicopathologic series from the Mayo Clinic and review of the literature.

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  • 1Department of Anatomic Pathology, Pitie Salpetriere Hospital, Paris, France. camilo.adem@psl.ap-hop-paris.fr

Abstract

Primary sarcomas of the breast are extremely rare, with less than 0.1% of all malignant tumours of the breast. Mayo Clinic Surgical Pathology database was searched for all breast sarcoma from 1910 to 2000. Pathology reports and slides were reviewed and tumour types were determined. Metaplastic carcinomas and phyllodes tumours were excluded. There were 25 women ranging in age 24-81 years (mean 45 years). All but one patient presented with a palpable lump. Mastectomy was performed in 19 patients and lumpectomy in five patients. Histopathological diagnoses were fibrosarcoma (six), angiosarcoma (six), pleomorphic sarcoma (six), leiomyosarcoma (two), myxofibrosarcoma (three), hemangiopericytoma (one) and osteosarcoma (one). Tumour size ranged from 0.3 to 12 cm (mean 5.7). Low-grade lesions were observed in 10 cases and high-grade in 15. Overall, mean follow-up was 10.5 years. Local recurrence was observed in 11 patients and ranged from 2 to 36 months (mean 15 m), while distant metastasis was observed in 10 patients (40%) affecting lungs, bones, liver, spleen, and skin. Of the 25 patients, 12 have died of disease and six of other causes. Five-year overall (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) were 66 and 70%, respectively. OS and DFS at 5 years were 91% for tumours < or =5 cm and 50% for tumours >5 cm. Tumour size was significantly associated with OS (risk ratio=1.3 per 1 cm increase; 95% CI, 1.02-1.7; P=0.036). There was no significant difference in OS or CSS between low- and high-grade lesions. In this series, tumour size was a more valuable prognostic factor than tumour grade.

PMID:
15187996
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2409972
Free PMC Article
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