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Rheumatology (Oxford). 2004 Aug;43(8):1025-7. Epub 2004 Jun 8.

Nailfold videocapillaroscopy in primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS).

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  • 1Laboratory for Research in Microcirculation, State University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate microcirculatory changes (functional and morphological) in primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS) patients.

METHODS:

Thirty-one patients were examined using nailfold videocapillaroscopy (18 PAPS patients and 13 healthy subjects). The patients were subdivided into two subgroups, with lupus anticoagulant (n = 8) and with anticardiolipin (n = 10) antibodies. Capillary morphology was determined; diameters ( micro m) and functional capillary density (FCD, number capillaries/mm2) were measured in control conditions. Blood flow velocity (CBFV, mm/s) was also evaluated at rest and after release of 60 s arterial occlusion.

RESULTS:

The percentage of subjects with at least one morphological alteration in the observed capillaries was 77.8% for patients and 21.3% for healthy subjects. Capillary diameters ( microm) [afferent (AD), apical (APD) and efferent (ED)] were significantly smaller (mean +/- s.d.: AD-PAPS, 7.4 +/- 2.1; control, 9.1 +/- 2.6, P = 0.063; APD-PAPS, 11.6 +/- 2.3; control, 14.4 +/- 3.8, P = 0.015; ED-PAPS, 8.4 +/- 2.0; control, 10.9 +/- 3.2, P = 0.011) in PAPS patients compared with controls. FCD (PAPS, 8.5 +/- 3.2; control, 8.3 +/- 2.9, P +/- 0.862), mean resting CBFV (PAPS, 0.73 +/- 0.31; control, 0.88 +/- 0.41, P = 0.278), mean peak CBFV after occlusion (PAPS, 1.07 +/- 0.52; control, 1.59 +/- 0.91, P = 0.063) and mean time (s) to reach it (PAPS, 5.2 +/- 1.7; control, 4.6 +/- 1.8, P = 0.101) were not statistically different between the two groups.

CONCLUSION:

Our results suggest that nailfold capillary morphology is altered in patients with PAPS, but these changes could not be correlated to impairment of functional parameters.

PMID:
15187240
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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