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J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2004 Jun;15(6):601-8.

Stent-based controlled release of intravascular angiostatin to limit plaque progression and in-stent restenosis.

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  • 1Department of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Dr. H3648, Stanford, California, 94305, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate the importance of angiogenesis in plaque progression after stent placement, this study examines stent-based controlled delivery of the antiangiogenic agent, angiostatin, in a rabbit model.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Controlled release biodegradable microspheres delivering angiostatin or polymer-only microspheres (polylactic-co-glycolic-acid-polyethylene glycol; PLGA/PEG) were loaded in channeled stents, anchored, and deployed in the aorta of adult New Zealand white rabbits (n = 6 animals per group, three each per time point). The stented aortas were harvested at 7 days and 28 days and evaluated for neovascularization, local inflammation, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, and in-stent plaque progression.

RESULTS:

At 7 days, neovascularization was significantly decreased in the angiostatin groups (1.6 +/- 1.6 neovessels per mm(2) plaque) versus the control group (15.4 +/- 2.6 neovessels per mm(2) plaque; P =.00081), as were local inflammation where angiostatin-treated groups demonstrated significantly lower macrophage recruitment per cross section (34.9 +/- 4.9 cells per cross section) relative to the control group (55.2 +/- 3.84 cells per cross section; P =.0037). And a significant decrease in the overall vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation (143.8 +/- 26.3 Ki-67 positive cells per mm(2)) relative to the control group (263.2 +/- 16.6 Ki-67 positive cells per mm(2); P =.00074). At both 7 and 28 days, in-stent plaque progression in the angiostatin groups was successfully limited relative to the control group by 54% (0.255 +/- 0.019% of cross section; P =.00016) and 19% (1.981 +/- 0.080; P =.0033) respectively and resulted in reduction of in-stent restenosis relative to the control group.

CONCLUSION:

Angiostatin-eluting stents may limit neovascularity after arterial implantation, offer insight into in-stent restenosis, and allow future refinement of bioactive stent designs and clinical strategies, particularly in light of evidence that intimal smooth muscle cells may in part be marrow-derived.

PMID:
15178721
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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