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Pediatrics. 2004 Jun;113(6):e617-27.

Shifts in percentiles of growth during early childhood: analysis of longitudinal data from the California Child Health and Development Study.

Author information

  • 1Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To document growth-velocity changes across major percentiles during the preschool years.

DESIGN:

Analyses of longitudinal data using height-for-age, weight-for-age, weight-for-height, and body mass index (BMI)-for-age percentiles were performed to examine crossing of major percentiles of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2000 growth charts. The 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles were defined as the major percentiles.

SETTING:

Data from the California Child Health and Development Study were used.

SUBJECTS:

A total of 10,844 children up to 60 months of age, with 44,296 height and weight measurements, were included in our final analysis.

RESULTS:

For height-for-age, 32% of children between birth and 6 months of age, 13% to 15% of children between 6 and 24 months of age, and 2% to 10% of children between 24 and 60 months of age crossed 2 major percentiles. For weight-for-age, 39% of children between birth and 6 months of age, 6% to 15% of children between 6 and 24 months of age, and 1% to 5% of children between 24 and 60 months of age crossed 2 major percentiles. In contrast, for weight-for-height, 62% of children between birth and 6 months of age, 20% to 27% of children between 6 and 24 months of age, and 6% to 15% of children between 24 to 60 months of age crossed 2 major percentiles. Similar to the pattern observed for weight-for-height, 8% to 15% of children between 24 and 60 months of age crossed 2 major BMI-for-age percentiles. During the preschool years, weight-for-height had the highest percentages of children who crossed 2 major percentiles, and weight-for-age had the lowest percentages of children who crossed 2 major percentiles among these 3 indices.

CONCLUSIONS:

Shifts in growth rates were very common for children from birth to 6 months of age, somewhat less common for children 6 to 24 months of age, and least common for children 24 to 60 months of age. Shifts in weight-for-height occurred more frequently than did other growth changes. Pediatricians must consider the prevalence of growth rate shifts during infancy and early childhood before they counsel parents regarding growth or refer children for additional evaluations of growth.

PMID:
15173545
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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