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J Biol Chem. 2004 Aug 27;279(35):36250-8. Epub 2004 Jun 1.

Novel lipoglycopeptides as inhibitors of bacterial signal peptidase I.

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  • 1Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN 46285, USA.

Abstract

Signal peptidase (SPase) I is responsible for the cleavage of signal peptides of many secreted proteins in bacteria. Because of its unique physiological and biochemical properties, it serves as a potential target for development of novel antibacterial agents. In this study, we report the production, isolation, and structure determination of a family of structurally related novel lipoglycopeptides from a Streptomyces sp. as inhibitors of SPase I. Detailed spectroscopic analyses, including MS and NMR, revealed that these lipoglycopeptides share a common 14-membered cyclic peptide core, an acyclic tripeptide chain, and a deoxy-alpha-mannose sugar, but differ in the degree of oxidation of the N-methylphenylglycine residue and the length and branching of the fatty acyl chain. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that these peptides are potent and competitive inhibitors of SPase I with K(i) 50 to 158 nm. In addition, they showed modest antibacterial activity against a panel of pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with minimal inhibitory concentration of 8-64 microm against Streptococcus pneumonniae and 4-8 microm against Escherichia coli. Notably, they mechanistically blocked the protein secretion in whole cells as demonstrated by inhibiting beta-lactamase release from Staphylococcus aureus. Taken together, the present discovery of a family of novel lipoglycopeptides as potent inhibitors of bacterial SPase I may lead to the development of a novel class of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

PMID:
15173160
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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