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N Engl J Med. 2004 May 20;350(21):2140-50.

Cardiac-resynchronization therapy with or without an implantable defibrillator in advanced chronic heart failure.

Author information

  • 1Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO 80262, USA. michael.bristow@uchsc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We tested the hypothesis that prophylactic cardiac-resynchronization therapy in the form of biventricular stimulation with a pacemaker with or without a defibrillator would reduce the risk of death and hospitalization among patients with advanced chronic heart failure and intraventricular conduction delays.

METHODS:

A total of 1520 patients who had advanced heart failure (New York Heart Association class III or IV) due to ischemic or nonischemic cardiomyopathies and a QRS interval of at least 120 msec were randomly assigned in a 1:2:2 ratio to receive optimal pharmacologic therapy (diuretics, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers, and spironolactone) alone or in combination with cardiac-resynchronization therapy with either a pacemaker or a pacemaker-defibrillator. The primary composite end point was the time to death from or hospitalization for any cause.

RESULTS:

As compared with optimal pharmacologic therapy alone, cardiac-resynchronization therapy with a pacemaker decreased the risk of the primary end point (hazard ratio, 0.81; P=0.014), as did cardiac-resynchronization therapy with a pacemaker-defibrillator (hazard ratio, 0.80; P=0.01). The risk of the combined end point of death from or hospitalization for heart failure was reduced by 34 percent in the pacemaker group (P<0.002) and by 40 percent in the pacemaker-defibrillator group (P<0.001 for the comparison with the pharmacologic-therapy group). A pacemaker reduced the risk of the secondary end point of death from any cause by 24 percent (P=0.059), and a pacemaker-defibrillator reduced the risk by 36 percent (P=0.003).

CONCLUSIONS:

In patients with advanced heart failure and a prolonged QRS interval, cardiac-resynchronization therapy decreases the combined risk of death from any cause or first hospitalization and, when combined with an implantable defibrillator, significantly reduces mortality.

Copyright 2004 Massachusetts Medical Society

PMID:
15152059
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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