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S Afr Med J. 2004 Apr;94(4):289-92.

PMTCT from research to reality--results from a routine service.

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  • 1Department of Molecular Medicine and Haematology, National Health Laboratory Service, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Assessment of the efficacy of a prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) programme in a routine service setting in comparison to a research environment.

DESIGN:

Descriptive study over a 13-month period utilising retrospective data obtained from hospital records complemented by prospective data on a sample of patients enrolled in a study to determine an affordable HIV diagnostic protocol for infants.

SETTING:

Routine PMTCT service at Coronation Women and Children's Hospital (CWCH) situated in Johannesburg and affiliated to the University of the Witwatersrand.

SUBJECTS:

Pregnant women known to be HIV infected who delivered at CWCH from 1 October 2001 to 31 October 2002.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

The HIV transmission rate to infants, which reflects nevirapine (NVP) delivery and infant feeding practices, and follow-up rates of perinatally exposed children.

RESULTS:

Of the 8,221 deliveries, 1,234 (15%) occurred in women known to be HIV infected. HIV transmission rates of 8.7% at 6 weeks and 8.9% at 3 months of age in the study population verifies the high rate of NVP administration and the ability of women to formula-feed their babies and abstain from breast-feeding. More than one-third of infants never return for follow-up and more than 70% are lost to follow-up by 4 months of age.

CONCLUSIONS:

The low HIV transmission rate confirms the efficacy of this routine service PMTCT programme. HIV-infected children are not being identified for medical management as part of PMTCT follow-up. It is imperative that record keeping is improved to facilitate ongoing monitoring.

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PMID:
15150944
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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