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Am J Vet Res. 2004 May;65(5):610-5.

Effect of danofloxacin and tilmicosin on body temperatures of beef calves with pneumonia experimentally induced by inoculation with Mannheimia haemolytica.

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  • 1Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010-3020, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine effects of danofloxacin and tilmicosin on continuously recorded body temperature in beef calves with pneumonia experimentally induced by inoculation of Mannheimia haemolytica.

ANIMALS:

41 Angus-cross heifers (body weight, 160 to 220 kg) without a recent history of respiratory tract disease or antimicrobial treatment, all from a single ranch.

PROCEDURE:

Radiotransmitters were implanted intravaginally in each calf. Pneumonia was induced intrabronchially by use of logarithmic-phase cultures of M. haemolytica. At 21 hours after inoculation, calves were treated with saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, danofloxacin, or tilmicosin. Body temperature was monitored from 66 hours before inoculation until 72 hours after treatment. Area under the curve (AUC) of the temperature-time plot and mean temperature were calculated for 3-hour intervals and compared among treatment groups.

RESULTS:

The AUCs for 3-hour intervals did not differ significantly among treatment groups for any of the time periods. Analysis of the mean temperature for 3-hour intervals revealed significantly higher temperatures at most time periods for saline-treated calves, compared with temperatures for antimicrobial-treated calves; however, we did not detect significant differences between the danofloxacin- and tilmicosin-treated calves. The circadian rhythm of temperatures before exposure was detected again approximately 48 hours after bacterial inoculation.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Danofloxacin and tilmicosin did not differ in their effect on mean body temperature for 3-hour intervals but significantly decreased body temperature, compared with body temperature in saline-treated calves. Normal daily variation in body temperature must be considered in the face of respiratory tract disease during clinical evaluation of feedlot cattle.

PMID:
15141881
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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