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Blood. 2004 Sep 1;104(5):1534-41. Epub 2004 May 11.

Therapeutic efficacy and safety of platelets treated with a photochemical process for pathogen inactivation: the SPRINT Trial.

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  • 1University of Minnesota, MMC 609, 420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. mccul001@umn.edu

Abstract

We report a transfusion trial of platelets photochemically treated for pathogen inactivation using the synthetic psoralen amotosalen HCl. Patients with thrombocytopenia were randomly assigned to receive either photochemically treated (PCT) or conventional (control) platelets for up to 28 days. The primary end point was the proportion of patients with World Health Organization (WHO) grade 2 bleeding during the period of platelet support. A total of 645 patients (318 PCT and 327 control) were evaluated. The primary end point, the incidence of grade 2 bleeding (58.5% PCT versus 57.5% control), and the secondary end point, the incidence of grade 3 or 4 bleeding (4.1% PCT versus 6.1% control), were equivalent between the 2 groups (P =.001 by noninferiority). The mean 1-hour posttransfusion platelet corrected count increment (CCI) (11.1 x 10(3) PCT versus 16.0 x 10(3) control), average number of days to next platelet transfusion (1.9 PCT versus 2.4 control), and number of platelet transfusions (8.4 PCT versus 6.2 control) were different (P <.001). Transfusion reactions were fewer following PCT platelets (3.0% PCT versus 4.4% control; P =.02). The incidence of grade 2 bleeding was equivalent for PCT and conventional platelets, although posttransfusion platelet count increments and days to next transfusion were decreased for PCT compared with conventional platelets.

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