Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Nat Biotechnol. 2004 May;22(5):535-46.

Alternative splicing in disease and therapy.

Author information

  • 1Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Center for RNA Biology, Box 3053, Research Drive, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA. garci001@mc.duke.edu

Abstract

Alternative splicing is the major source of proteome diversity in humans and thus is highly relevant to disease and therapy. For example, recent work suggests that the long-sought-after target of the analgesic acetaminophen is a neural-specific, alternatively spliced isoform of cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1). Several important diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, have been linked with mutations or variations in either cis-acting elements or trans-acting factors that lead to aberrant splicing and abnormal protein production. Correction of erroneous splicing is thus an important goal of molecular therapies. Recent experiments have used modified oligonucleotides to inhibit cryptic exons or to activate exons weakened by mutations, suggesting that these reagents could eventually lead to effective therapies.

PMID:
15122293
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk