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Eur J Nutr. 2004 Apr;43(2):100-8. Epub 2004 Jan 6.

Short-term effects of high soy supplementation on sex hormones, bone markers, and lipid parameters in young female adults.

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  • 1Department of Nutrition Science, University of Bonn, Endenicher Allee 11-13, 53115 Bonn, Germany. a.zittermann@uni-bonn.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

High intake of soy products has been suggested to prevent breast cancer, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular diseases.

AIM OF THE STUDY:

To investigate the effects of isoflavone-containing soy on circulating sex hormones, biomarkers of bone turnover, and lipoprotein profiles.

METHODS:

Fourteen young women received in a randomized crossover design 5 soy cookies (52 mg isoflavones) or 5 soy-free cookies (no isoflavones) per day for one menstrual cycle starting one week before menstruation. Serum and urine analyses were performed on day 3 after onset of menstruation (t(1)), 3 days before ovulation (t(2)), 3 days after ovulation (t(3)), during the midluteal phase (t(4)), and again 3 days after onset of the next menstruation (t(5)).

RESULTS:

With the exception of higher progesterone levels at t(2), soy supplementation did not affect the physiologic fluctuations in circulating sex hormones. The ratio of C-telopeptide (a bone resorption marker) to osteocalcin (a bone formation marker) was slightly higher at t(4) during the soy period compared to t(4) during the control period (P < 0.05), indicating an uncoupling of bone resorption and formation processes. Serum levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol were not influenced by soy intake.

CONCLUSIONS:

High short-term isoflavone-containing soy intake slightly affects physiologic fluctuations in bone turnover, but has no significant effects on most circulating sex hormones and on lipoprotein parameters in young healthy women.

PMID:
15083317
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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