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Helicobacter. 2004 Apr;9(2):100-5.

Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastric acid secretion and meal-stimulated serum gastrin in children.

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  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Showa Inan General Hospital, Komagane, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Comparative studies of gastric acid secretion in children related to Helicobacter pylori infection are lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare acid secretion and meal-stimulated gastrin in relation to H. pylori infection among pediatric patients.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Thirty-six children aged 10-17 years (17 with H. pylori infection) undergoing diagnostic endoscopy participated in the study. Diagnoses included gastritis only (n = 23), duodenal ulcer (n = 5) and normal histology (n = 8). Gastric acid output was studied using the endoscopic gastric secretion test before and 2-3 months after H. pylori eradication. Meal-stimulated serum gastrin response was assessed before and 12 months after eradication.

RESULTS:

H. pylori gastritis was typically antrum-predominant. Acid secretion was greater in H. pylori-positive patients with duodenal ulcer than in gastritis-only patients or controls [mean +/- standard error (SE): 6.56 +/- 1.4, 3.11 +/- 0.4 and 2.65 +/- 0.2 mEq/10 minutes, respectively; p <.001]. Stimulated acid secretion was higher in H. pylori-positive boys than girls (5.0 +/- 0.8 vs. 2.51 +/- 0.4 mEq/10 minutes, respectively; p <.05). Stimulated acid secretion pre- and post-H. pylori eradication was similar (5.47 +/- 0.8 vs. 4.67 +/- 0.9 mEq/10 minutes, respectively; p =.21). Increased basal and meal-stimulated gastrin release reversed following H. pylori eradication (e.g. basal from 134 to 46 pg/ml, p <.001 and peak from 544 to 133 pg/ml, p <.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

H. pylori infection in children is associated with a marked but reversible increase in meal-stimulated serum gastrin release. Gastric acid hypersecretion in duodenal ulcer remains after H. pylori eradication, suggesting that the host factor plays a critical role in outcome of the infection.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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