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Fertil Steril. 2004 Mar;81(3):611-6.

Age at natural menopause is not linked with the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor region: a sib-pair study.

Author information

  • 1Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Studies have shown that age at natural menopause is heritable. Mutations in the FSH-receptor have been identified in women with premature ovarian failure (POF) and the FSH-receptor gene may, therefore, be considered a candidate gene for (early) menopausal age. This study investigates whether there is linkage between genetic markers in the FSH-receptor region and (early) age at menopause using a sib-pair design.

DESIGN:

Sib-pair based linkage analysis.

SETTING:

Sister pairs and their first-degree family members from The Netherlands.

PATIENT(S):

The inclusion criteria for a family were natural menopause in upper or lower tail of the distribution of menopausal age in at least two sisters. A total of 126 families with at least one sib-pair were included in this study. Six polymorphic markers encompassing the FSH-receptor gene were genotyped.

INTERVENTION(S):

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Single point and multipoint logarithm of the odds (LOD) scores.

RESULT(S):

None of the markers showed evidence in favor of linkage with overall age at natural menopause or early age at natural menopause.

CONCLUSION(S):

Possibly, age at natural menopause in the more or less normal range is not part of the spectrum of phenotypes determined by mutations in the FSH-receptor gene. Alternatively, our results might be explained by genetic heterogeneity in the left tail of the distribution of menopausal age. This can limit the chance of finding a genetic locus, especially if this factor has a modest contribution to the phenotype.

PMID:
15037410
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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