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J Affect Disord. 2004 Apr;79(1-3):63-70.

Clinical and psychosocial factors associated with the outcome of unipolar major depression: a one year prospective study.

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  • 1Hospital Universitario La Princesa, Madrid 28006, Spain. eezquiaga@yahoo.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The role of psychosocial and clinical variables in the prediction of major depression is controversial. In a previous paper, we obtained a one-year predictive multivariate model of non-remission for major depression, based on the presence of a personality disorder, a low self-esteem and a low satisfaction with social support.

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate more in depth both personality disorders and psychosocial variables as predictors of outcome.

METHODS:

A prospective study on 57 consecutive outpatients with major depressive episodes were followed-up monthly during one year. Clinical and psychosocial variables were registered, including personality (DSM-IV criteria and IPDE structured interview), previous quality of life, self-esteem, social support and dyadic adjustment. Remission was defined as a HDS score less than 8. Univariate and multivariate (logistic regression) analyses were applied.

RESULTS:

68% of the patients reached remission at 12 months. Personality disorder (diagnosed clinically but not according to IPDE), and previous quality of life were the variables more consistently associated to remission at 12 months. Among follow-up variables, remission at 3 months was strongly associated with remission.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings confirm the importance of the clinical diagnosis of personality disorder in the major depression outcome. However, more studies are needed to clarify the divergence between clinical and structured interview guided diagnosis. With the exception of quality of life, psychosocial variables had a weak and non consistent relationship with outcome.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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