Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am Fam Physician. 2004 Mar 1;69(5):1117-20.

Palmoplantar hyperhidrosis: a therapeutic challenge.

Author information

  • 1University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey 07103-2714, USA.

Abstract

Excessive sweating from the palms and soles, known as palmoplantar hyperhidrosis, affects both children and adults. Diagnosis of this potentially embarrassing and socially disabling condition is based on the patient's history and visible signs of sweating. The condition usually is idiopathic. Treatment remains a challenge: options include topical and systemic agents, iontophoresis, and botulinum toxin type A injections, with surgical sympathectomy as a last resort. None of the treatments is without limitations or associated complications. Topical aluminum chloride hexahydrate therapy and iontophoresis are simple, safe, and inexpensive therapies; however, continuous application is required because results are often short-lived, and they may be insufficient. Systemic agents such as anticholinergic drugs are tolerated poorly at the dosages required for efficacy and usually are not an option because of their associated toxicity. While botulinum toxin can be used in treatment-resistant cases, numerous painful injections are required, and effects are limited to a few months. Surgical sympathectomy should be reserved for the most severe cases and should be performed only after all other treatments have failed. Although the safety and reliability of treatments for palmoplantar hyperhidrosis have improved dramatically, side effects and compensatory sweating are still common, potentially severe problems.

PMID:
15023010
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for American Academy of Family Physicians
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk