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Arthritis Rheum. 2004 Mar;50(3):961-7.

In vivo imaging of experimental arthritis with near-infrared fluorescence.

Author information

  • 1Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Fredrich Schiller University Jena, Jena, Germany. andreas.hansch@med.uni-jena.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To visualize early experimental arthritis with near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging in a murine model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA).

METHODS:

The target of NIRF was the F4/80 antigen present on the surface of macrophages infiltrating the inflamed synovial membrane. Imaging was performed using anti-F4/80 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) labeled with Cy5.5 fluorochrome. On day 7 of AIA, 6 mice received an intravenous (IV) injection of labeled mAb; control AIA mice (n = 6) received an IV injection of Cy5.5-labeled isotype control antibody. NIRF imaging was performed before injection (baseline) and until 72 hours thereafter. Histologic evaluation of arthritis severity and immunohistochemical assessment of F4/80 antigen density were also performed on day 7.

RESULTS:

NIRF imaging showed an accumulation of fluorochrome probes in the inflamed knee joints and, to a lesser extent, in the contralateral (nonarthritic) knee joints. The signal induced by mAb F4/80 was clearly higher than that generated by the isotype control. Accumulation of fluorochrome probes in the joints was confirmed histologically by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

CONCLUSION:

The use of fluorochromes allows imaging of arthritis in the near-infrared range. Accumulation in the contralateral, nonarthritic knee joints can be explained by the presence of sentinel macrophages in normal synovium or by a mild contralateral response due to systemic activation or neurogenic mechanisms.

PMID:
15022340
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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