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J Immunol. 2004 Mar 15;172(6):3905-12.

Impairment of IL-12-dependent STAT4 nuclear translocation in a patient with recurrent Mycobacterium avium infection.

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  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Mie University School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie, Japan.

Abstract

We examined the immunological abnormality in a patient with recurrent Mycobacterium avium infection. T cells from the patient showed decreased ability both to produce IFN-gamma and to proliferate in response to IL-12. Despite decreased expression of IL-12R beta1 and beta2 chains in the patient's PHA-activated T cells, there was no difference in IL-12-induced tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of STAT4 in PHA-activated T cells between the patient and healthy subjects, suggesting that IL-12R signals are transmitted to STAT4 in the patient's PHA-activated T cells. Using EMSA, confocal laser microscopy, and Western blotting, we demonstrated that the nuclear translocation of STAT4 in response to IL-12 is reduced in PHA-activated T cells from the patient when compared with those from healthy subjects. Leptomycin B was used to examine whether nuclear export of STAT4 is increased in the patient's T cells. However, leptomycin B treatment did not reverse impaired IL-12-induced nuclear accumulation of STAT4. Although the exact mechanism responsible for the impaired STAT4 nuclear translocation in this patient remains unclear, the absence of mutation in the IL-12Rbeta1, IL-12Rbeta2, STAT4, and STAT4-binding sequence of the IFN-gamma gene and preservation of STAT4 tyrosine and serine phosphorylation suggest the existence of a defective STAT4 nuclear translocation. This defect is likely responsible for the impaired STAT4 nuclear translocation in IL-12-stimulated T cells, leading to impairment of both IFN-gamma production and cell proliferation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with atypical mycobacterial infection associated with impairment of STAT4 nuclear translocation.

PMID:
15004198
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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