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J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2004 Jan-Feb;41(1):39-45.

Peripheral and central visual fields in 11-year-old children who had been born prematurely and at term.

Author information

  • 1Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To examine the peripheral and central visual fields in children who had been born prematurely and at term.

METHODS:

Four groups of 11-year-old children were examined: group 1 included 24 children who had been born at term (control group); group 2 included 20 children who had been born prematurely without ROP; group 3 included 22 children who had been born prematurely with untreated ROP (stages 2 and 3); and group 4 included 21 children who had been born prematurely and underwent cryotreatment for severe ROP. Their peripheral visual fields were examined with Goldmann perimetry. Static high-pass resolution perimetry was used to evaluate their central visual fields within 30 degrees.

RESULTS:

The peripheral visual fields were constricted in children who had undergone cryotreatment (group 4), as compared with the other groups (1 to 3). We found no difference between the groups of children who had been born prematurely with or without ROP (groups 2 and 3) and the control group. The function of the central visual fields, expressed as neural capacity, was reduced in the children who had been born prematurely compared with the controls, significantly in their left eyes only. The children who underwent cryotreament did not differ from the other children who had been born prematurely in this respect.

CONCLUSIONS:

The peripheral visual fields were constricted in children who had undergone cryotreatment. It is uncertain whether this was caused by the treatment or by severe ROP. The central visual fields showed a tendency of reduced neural capacity in the children who had been born prematurely, reflecting a reduced density of retinocortical neural channels. However, this was not related to ROP or cryotreatment.

PMID:
14974834
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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