Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Arch Dermatol. 2004 Feb;140(2):183-8.

Association between anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome and human herpesvirus 6 reactivation and hypogammaglobulinemia.

Author information

  • 1Department of Dermatology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS) is a life-threatening, drug-induced, multiorgan system reaction. The identification of predisposing factors is clearly needed to predict the incidence and outcome of AHS; attention has recently been focused on reactivation of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6).

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether immunosuppressive conditions that can allow HHV-6 reactivation could be specifically detected in association with the onset of AHS.

DESIGN:

We analyzed patients with AHS who were treated during 1997-2002. Two groups of patients receiving anticonvulsants served as controls.

SETTING:

Department of Dermatology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. Patients Ten patients with AHS.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The results of serologic tests for antibody titers for various viruses, including HHV-6, HHV-6 DNA detection by real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoglobulin levels by turbidimetric immunoassay, IgG subclass levels by nephelometry, and CD19(+) B-cell counts by flow cytometric analysis, were sequentially assessed.

RESULTS:

Serum IgG levels (mean, 745 mg/dL) and circulating B-cell counts (mean, 88/ micro L) in patients with AHS were significantly decreased at onset compared with control groups (P<.001 and P =.007, respectively). These alterations returned to normal on full recovery. Reactivation of HHV-6 as judged by a greater than 4-fold increase in HHV-6 IgG titers was exclusively detected in most patients with AHS associated with decreased IgG levels and B-cell counts.

CONCLUSIONS:

A decrease in immunoglobulin levels and B-cell counts can be associated with HHV-6 reactivation and the subsequent onset of AHS. These immunological alterations might be a useful predictor of the development of AHS.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk