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Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 Apr;28(4):543-50.

Higher income is more strongly associated with obesity than with obesity-related metabolic disorders in Jamaican adults.

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  • 1Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, CB# 8120, University Square, 123 West Franklin St Chapel Hill, NC 27516-2524, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study compares how income is related to obesity vs two obesity-related cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors-diabetes and hypertension-in adults from Jamaica.

DESIGN:

A cross-sectional population-based survey was used. In total, 847 men and 1249 women aged 25-74 y were randomly recruited from a periurban area in 1993-1998.

MEASUREMENTS:

Trained interviewers measured anthropometry and blood pressure, obtained fasting blood and collected self-reported data on income and disease history.

RESULTS:

Income was strongly and positively associated with obesity in men. In women, obesity levels were high even among the very poor, and the income gradient was more moderate. Although obesity-and particularly central fatness-was strongly associated with diabetes and hypertension prevalence, income was not significantly related to these disorders.

CONCLUSIONS:

Future research in developing countries should independently explore associations between income and obesity vs obesity-related disorders, and identify factors that explain any disparities.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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