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Cell Tissue Res. 2004 Mar;315(3):393-406. Epub 2004 Feb 5.

Development of two bone-derived cell lines from the marine teleost Sparus aurata; evidence for extracellular matrix mineralization and cell-type-specific expression of matrix Gla protein and osteocalcin.

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  • 1CCMAR, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal.

Abstract

A growing interest in the understanding of the ontogeny and mineralization of fish skeleton has emerged from the recent implementation of fish as a vertebrate model, particularly for skeletal development. Whereas several in vivo studies dealing with the regulation of bone formation in fish have been published, in vitro studies have been hampered because of a complete lack of fish-bone-derived cell systems. We describe here the development and the characterization of two new cell lines, designated VSa13 and VSa16, derived from the vertebra of the gilthead sea bream. Both cell types exhibit a spindle-like phenotype and slow growth when cultured in Leibovitz's L-15 medium and a polygonal phenotype and rapid growth in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (D-MEM). Scanning electron microscopy and von Kossa staining have revealed that the VSa13 and VSa16 cells can only mineralize their extracellular matrix when cultured in D-MEM under mineralizing conditions, forming calcium-phosphate crystals similar to hydroxyapatite. We have also demonstrated the involvement of alkaline phosphatase, a marker of bone formation in vivo, and Gla proteins (osteocalcin and matrix Gla protein, MGP) in the process of mineralization. Finally, we have shown that VSa13 and VSa16 cell lines express osteocalcin and MGP in a mutually exclusive manner. Thus, both cell lines are capable of mineralizing in vitro and of expressing genes found in chondrocyte and osteoblast cell lineages, emphasizing the suitability of these new cell lines as valuable tools for analyzing the expression and regulation of cartilage- and bone-specific genes.

PMID:
14762709
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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