Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Public Health. 2004 Feb;94(2):269-78.

Working class matters: socioeconomic disadvantage, race/ethnicity, gender, and smoking in NHIS 2000.

Author information

  • 1Center for Community-Based Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Department of Society, Human Development and Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. elizabeth_barbeau@dfci.harvard.edu

Erratum in

  • Am J Public Health. 2004 Aug;94(8):1295.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We sought to describe the burden of smoking on the US population, using diverse socioeconomic measures.

METHODS:

We analyzed data from the 2000 National Health Interview Survey.

RESULTS:

Overall, the prevalence of current smoking was greatest among persons in--and independently associated with--working class jobs, low educational level, and low income. Attempts to quit showed no socioeconomic gradient, while success in quitting was greatest among those with the most socioeconomic resources. These patterns held in most but not all race/ethnicity-gender groups. Finer resolution of smoking patterns was obtained using a relational UK occupational measure, compared to the skill-based measure commonly used in US studies.

CONCLUSIONS:

Reducing social disparities in smoking requires attention to the complexities of class along with race/ethnicity and gender.

Comment in

PMID:
14759942
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1448243
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk