Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2004 Feb;158(2):170-6.

An intervention to reduce television viewing by preschool children.

Author information

  • 1Research Institute, Bassett Healthcare, 1 Atwell Road, Cooperstown, NY 13326, USA. barbara.dennison@bassett.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Television viewing has been associated with increased violence in play and higher rates of obesity. Although there are interventions to reduce television viewing by school-aged children, there are none for younger children.

OBJECTIVE:

To develop and evaluate an intervention to reduce television viewing by preschool children.

DESIGN:

Randomized controlled trial conducted in 16 preschool and/or day care centers in rural upstate New York.

PATIENTS:

Children aged 2.6 through 5.5 years.

INTERVENTION:

Children attending intervention centers received a 7-session program designed to reduce television viewing as part of a health promotion curriculum, whereas children attending the control centers received a safety and injury prevention program.

OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS:

Change in parent-reported child television/video viewing and measured growth variables.

RESULTS:

Before the intervention, the intervention and control groups viewed 11.9 and 14.0 h/wk of television/videos, respectively. Afterward, children in the intervention group decreased their television/video viewing 3.1 h/wk, whereas children in the control group increased their viewing by 1.6 h/wk, for an adjusted difference between the groups of -4.7 h/wk (95% confidence interval, -8.4 to -1.0 h/wk; P =.02). The percentage of children watching television/videos more than 2 h/d also decreased significantly from 33% to 18% among the intervention group, compared with an increase of 41% to 47% among the control group, for a difference of -21.5% (95% confidence interval, -42.5% to -0.5%; P =.046). There were no statistically significant differences in children's growth between groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study is the first to show that a preschool-based intervention can lead to reductions in young children's television/video viewing. Further research is needed to determine the long-term effects associated with reductions in young children's television viewing.

PMID:
14757609
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk