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Health Psychol. 2004 Jan;23(1):101-5.

The unconscious cost of good fortune: implicit and explicit self-esteem, positive life events, and health.

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  • 1Department of Psychology, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260, USA. shimizu3@buffalo.edu

Abstract

J. D. Brown and K. L. McGill (1989) found that positive life events were associated with better health only for people high in self-esteem. Among people low in self-esteem, positive life events were associated with poorer health. The authors of this study replicated this finding in a self-report survey of 61 male and 110 female college students. In addition, they showed that implicit self-esteem moderated the relation between positive life events and self-reported health in the same fashion as explicit self-esteem did. Whereas people high in implicit self-esteem reported being healthier when they experienced more positive life events, people low in implicit self-esteem reported being healthier when they experienced fewer positive life events. Moreover, the effects of implicit self-esteem were statistically independent of the effects of explicit self-esteem.

(c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved

PMID:
14756609
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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