Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Genes Dev. 2004 Feb 1;18(3):278-89. Epub 2004 Jan 26.

Suppression of mitochondrial respiration through recruitment of p160 myb binding protein to PGC-1alpha: modulation by p38 MAPK.

Author information

  • 1Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.


The transcriptional coactivator PPAR gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1alpha) is a key regulator of metabolic processes such as mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration in muscle and gluconeogenesis in liver. Reduced levels of PGC-1alpha in humans have been associated with type II diabetes. PGC-1alpha contains a negative regulatory domain that attenuates its transcriptional activity. This negative regulation is removed by phosphorylation of PGC-1alpha by p38 MAPK, an important kinase downstream of cytokine signaling in muscle and beta-adrenergic signaling in brown fat. We describe here the identification of p160 myb binding protein (p160MBP) as a repressor of PGC-1alpha. The binding and repression of PGC-1alpha by p160MBP is disrupted by p38 MAPK phosphorylation of PGC-1alpha. Adenoviral expression of p160MBP in myoblasts strongly reduces PGC-1alpha's ability to stimulate mitochondrial respiration and the expression of the genes of the electron transport system. This repression does not require removal of PGC-1alpha from chromatin, suggesting that p160MBP is or recruits a direct transcriptional suppressor. Overall, these data indicate that p160MBP is a powerful negative regulator of PGC-1alpha function and provide a molecular mechanism for the activation of PGC-1alpha by p38 MAPK. The discovery of p160MBP as a PGC-1alpha regulator has important implications for the understanding of energy balance and diabetes.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk