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J Biol Chem. 2004 Apr 2;279(14):14294-306. Epub 2004 Jan 19.

HIP1 and HIP1r stabilize receptor tyrosine kinases and bind 3-phosphoinositides via epsin N-terminal homology domains.

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  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, Graduate Program in Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.

Abstract

Huntingtin-interacting protein 1-related (HIP1r) is the only known mammalian relative of huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1), a protein that transforms fibroblasts via undefined mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that both HIP1r and HIP1 bind inositol lipids via their epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domains. In contrast to other ENTH domain-containing proteins, lipid binding is preferential to the 3-phosphate-containing inositol lipids, phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate. Furthermore, the HIP1r ENTH domain, like that of HIP1, is necessary for lipid binding, and expression of an ENTH domain-deletion mutant, HIP1r/deltaE, induces apoptosis. Consistent with the ability of HIP1r and HIP1 to affect cell survival, full-length HIP1 and HIP1r stabilize pools of growth factor receptors by prolonging their half-life following ligand-induced endocytosis. Although HIP1r and HIP1 display only a partially overlapping pattern of protein interactions, these data suggest that both proteins share a functional homology by binding 3-phosphorylated inositol lipids and stabilizing receptor tyrosine kinases in a fashion that may contribute to their ability to alter cell growth and survival.

PMID:
14732715
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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