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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1992 Dec;167(6):1543-7.

The immunoglobulin G fraction from plasma containing antiphospholipid antibodies causes increased placental thromboxane production.

Author information

  • 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Northwestern University Medical School, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL 60611.

Erratum in

  • Am J Obstet Gynecol 1993 Aug;169(2 Pt 1):439.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Our objective was to evaluate whether the immunoglobulin G fraction from plasma containing high levels of antiphospholipid antibodies alters the production of prostacyclin or thromboxane when incubated with normal human placental tissue.

STUDY DESIGN:

The immunoglobulin G fraction was prepared from the pooled plasma of five volunteers with normal obstetric histories and no antiphospholipid antibodies. The immunoglobulin G fraction was prepared similarly from a patient with the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. Doses of these immunoglobulin G fractions ranging from 0.3 to 3.0 mg were incubated with placental explants obtained from eight normal pregnancies, and prostacyclin and thromboxane production was assessed over 48 hours.

RESULTS:

Placental prostacyclin production was unaltered by incubation with either immunoglobulin G fraction at any of the doses tested. Placental thromboxane production tripled by 32 hours with the addition of 0.6, 1.5, and 3.0 mg of the antiphospholipid antibody fraction (p < 0.05) compared with baseline production but was unaltered by the addition of the normal pooled plasma fraction at any dose. The increase in thromboxane production with antiphospholipid antibody immunoglobulin G appeared to be dose related.

CONCLUSION:

The immunoglobulin G fraction prepared from plasma containing antiphospholipid antibodies caused increased placental thromboxane production without altering prostacyclin production.

PMID:
1471662
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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