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Eur J Immunogenet. 2003 Dec;30(6):421-5.

IL12B and IRF1 gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to celiac disease.

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  • 1Department of Immunogenetics, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Celiac disease (CD) is a common gastro-intestinal disorder resulting from permanent intolerance to wheat gliadins and related proteins in rye and barley. In addition to the strong genetic association with HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8, a genetic region on chromosomes 5 (CELIAC2) has been identified that harbours a susceptibility gene for CD. The gene(s) responsible for this association, however, remains to be identified. In the present study we evaluated polymorphisms in the genes encoding interleukin-12 p40 (IL12B) and interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1). Both genes are located in the celiac2 region, and have key roles in inducing interferon (IFN)-gamma secreting T helper 1 (Th1) cells, one of the immunological hallmarks of CD. The frequencies of a TaqI gene polymorphism in the 3' UTR of IL12B and a HinfI gene polymorphism in the 3' UTR of IRF1 were studied in 258 Dutch CD patients and 237 ethnically matched healthy controls. The transmission of the polymorphic variants from parents to affected child was determined in 123 families with at least one affected child. The frequencies of the IL12B TaqI gene polymorphism and the IRF1 HinfI gene polymorphism did not differ significantly between patients and controls. In addition, in the family study, no deviation from the expected transmission from parents to affected child of any of the polymorphic variants was found. The IL12B TaqI and the IRF1 HinfI gene polymorphisms do not appear to be involved in susceptibility to CD. Further studies on the factors that drive the Th1 immunopathology in CD are required.

PMID:
14675396
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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