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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003 Dec 23;100(26):15806-11. Epub 2003 Dec 12.

Diversity of regulatory CD4+T cells controlling distinct organ-specific autoimmune diseases.

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  • 1Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U580, and Institut Fédératif Necker Enfants Malades, Faculté Necker Enfants Malades, 161 Rue de Sèvres, 75015 Paris, France.

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  • Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Mar 23;101(12):4331.

Abstract

Depletion of selected regulatory CD4+ T cell subsets induces the spontaneous onset of various immune or autoimmune disorders. It is not clear, however, whether a given subset, notably CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells, protects from a wide spectrum of immune disorders, or whether specialized subsets of regulatory T cells control each given disease or group of diseases. We report here, using diabetes prone nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, that depending on the regulatory T cells that are depleted, i.e., CD25+, CD62L+, or CD45RB(low), distinct immune diseases appear after transfer into NOD severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) recipients. Thus, reconstitution of NOD SCID mice with CD25- T cells induces major gastritis and late-onset diabetes, but no or mild colitis. Reconstitution with CD62L- T cells induces fulminant diabetes with no colitis or gastritis. Reconstitution with CD45RB(high) T cells induces major colitis with wasting disease and no or very moderate gastritis and diabetes. Major differences among the three regulatory T cell subsets are also seen in vitro. The bulk of suppressor cells inhibiting the proliferation of CD4+CD25- T cells in coculture is concentrated within the CD25+ but not the CD62L+ or CD45RB(low) T cell subsets. Similarly, cytokine production patterns are significantly different for each regulatory T cell subset. Collectively, these data point to the diversity and organ selectivity of regulatory T cells controlling distinct autoimmune diseases whatever the underlying mechanisms.

PMID:
14673094
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC307649
Free PMC Article
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