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J Hepatol. 2004 Jan;40(1):8-13.

Studies on the mechanism of accumulation of cholesterol in the gallbladder mucosa. Evidence that sterol 27-hydroxylase is not a pathogenetic factor.

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  • 1Division of Clinical Chemistry, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Huddinge University Hospital, K63, SE-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

Cholesterolosis is characterized by accumulation of esterified cholesterol in human gallbladder mucosa. The present study aimed at investigating possible pathogenetic factors for cholesterolosis. The hypothesis was tested that a reduced sterol 27-hydroxylase or an increased amount of ACAT-1 enzyme may be of importance.

METHODS:

Gall bladder mucosa and bile were obtained from patients with cholesterol gallstones undergoing cholecystectomy (30 with and 43 without cholesterolosis).

RESULTS:

In cholesterolosis, the gall bladder mucosa was characterized by a several-fold increase in esterified cholesterol and normal content of free cholesterol. The amount of ACAT-1 protein, measured by immunoblotting, was similar in patients with and without cholesterolosis. The level of 27-hydroxycholesterol in gallbladder mucosa was elevated sevenfold as compared with cholesterol in patients with cholesterolosis. Most (87%) of this oxysterol was esterified and the accumulation is most probably secondary to the higher total amount of cholesterol in the cells. Patients with cholesterolosis had normal levels of both sterol 27-hydroxylase mRNA (real time polymerase chain reaction) and protein (immunoblotting). The enzymatic activity of the sterol 27-hydroxylase in gallbladder mucosa was normal or increased in cholesterolosis.

CONCLUSIONS:

The pathogenesis of cholesterolosis may be multifactorial, but is not caused by reduced efflux of cholesterol due to a defect sterol 27-hydroxylase mechanism.

PMID:
14672608
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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