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Allergol Immunopathol (Madr). 2003 Nov-Dec;31(6):329-37.

The efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy for respiratory allergy is not affected by different dosage regimens in the induction phase.

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  • 1ASL 12, Pavia, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sublingual administration of allergens is a safe and effective alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy in patients with respiratory allergies. A drawback to this therapeutic approach is the relatively long and complex management of the induction phase.

AIM OF THE STUDY:

To determine whether different induction regimens affect the outcome of sublingual immunotherapy.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Adult and pediatric patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and/or asthma were included in the study. Ten subjects served as controls and received symptomatic treatments. Forty-three subjects were allocated to sublingual immunotherapy, with three different induction protocols (8-, 15- and 20-day, respectively). Symptom and medication scores, skin test results and (in asthmatic patients) FEV1 values were monitored for two years. Adverse effects were recorded. All induction regimens produced a significant improvement in symptom and medication usage (p < 0.0001); skin test scores decreased (p < 0.0001) and FEV1 improved (p < 0.05). In contrast, symptom and skin test scores did not significantly change in controls. No relevant adverse effects were observed with any of the induction regimens.

CONCLUSIONS:

For patients with respiratory allergies, sublingual immunotherapy with an 8-day induction protocol is safe and effective. Our results encourage the usage of shorter induction regimens, which produce better compliance with this therapy.

PMID:
14670288
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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