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J Immunol. 2003 Dec 15;171(12):6549-55.

Nasal vaccination with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein reduces stroke size by inducing IL-10-producing CD4+ T cells.

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  • 1Center for Neurologic Diseases, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

Inflammation plays an important role in ischemic stroke and in humans IL-10 may have a beneficial effect in stroke. We mucosally administered myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) 35-55 peptide to C57BL/6 mice before middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) to induce an anti-inflammatory T cell response directed at CNS myelin. Nasal and oral administration of MOG(35-55) peptide decreased ischemic infarct size at 24 and 72 h after MCAO surgery. Nasal MOG(35-55) peptide was most efficacious and reduced infarct size by 70% at 24 h and by 50% at 72 h (p <or= 0.0001 vs control) and also improved behavior score. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated increased IL-10 and reduced IFN-gamma in the area surrounding the ischemic infarct following nasal treatment. Nasal MOG did not reduce infarct size in IL-10-deficient mice. Adoptive transfer of CD4(+) T cells to untreated mice from nasally tolerized mice before MCAO surgery decreased stroke size (p < 0.001 vs control), whereas, CD4(+) T cells from nasally tolerized IL-10-deficient mice had no effect. Our results demonstrate that IL-10-secreting CD4(+) T cells induced by nasal MOG reduce injury following stroke. In addition, we observed a dramatic reduction of CD11b(+) cells in nasal MOG-treated animals. CD11b(+) cells may contribute to secondary infarct expansion by enhancing NO synthesis that may be reduced by elevated IL-10 levels. Modulation of cerebral inflammation by nasal vaccination with myelin Ags that increase IL-10 in the brain may improve outcome after stroke and enhance mechanisms of recovery.

PMID:
14662856
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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