Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Resuscitation. 2003 Dec;59(3):353-9.

Compared to angiotensin II, epinephrine is associated with high myocardial blood flow following return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest.

Author information

  • 1Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Surgery, Health Sciences Center, University of Colorado, 4200 E. Ninth Avenue, Denver, CO 80262, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Epinephrine (adrenaline) and vasopressin are used currently to improve myocardial blood flow (MBF) during cardiac arrest. Angiotensin II has also been shown to improve MBF during CPR. We explored the effects of angiotensin II or epinephrine alone, and the combination of angiotensin with epinephrine, on myocardial and cerebral blood flows in a swine model of cardiac arrest.

METHODS:

Swine were instrumented for regional blood flow measurements. Ventricular fibrillation was induced and CPR begun. Angiotensin II 50 mcg/kg (ANG), epinephrine 0.02 mg/kg (EPI) or the combination (ANG+EPI) was administered. Blood flow was measured during baseline normal sinus rhythm (NSR), before (CPR) and after drug administration (CPR+DRUG), and post reperfusion return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC).

RESULTS:

All groups had a significant increase in MBF during CPR following drug administration (P<0.05). [table: see text] There was a trend toward higher flows in the EPI groups. The group receiving both EPI and ANG did not have higher blood flows than the EPI or ANG alone groups. Both groups that received EPI had markedly elevated MBF following ROSC compared with angiotensin II (P<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

The combination of ANG and EPI did not improve MBF during cardiac arrest. Epinephrine may increase MBF compared with angiotensin II post-reperfusion.

PMID:
14659605
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk