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Ann Rheum Dis. 2003 Dec;62(12):1208-14.

Sequence variations in the collagen IX and XI genes are associated with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis.

Author information

  • 1Collagen Research Unit, Biocentre and Department of Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is usually caused by disc herniation or degeneration. Several genetic factors have been implicated in disc disease. Tryptophan alleles in COL9A2 and COL9A3 have been shown to be associated with lumbar disc disease in the Finnish population, and polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor gene (VDR) (FokI and TaqI), the matrix metalloproteinase-3 gene (MMP-3) and an aggrecan gene (AGC1) VNTR have been reported to be associated with disc degeneration. In addition, an IVS6-4 a>t polymorphism in COL11A2 has been found in connection with stenosis caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the Japanese population.

OBJECTIVE:

To study the role of genetic factors in LSS.

METHODS:

29 Finnish probands were analysed for mutations in the genes coding for intervertebral disc matrix proteins, COL1A1, COL1A2, COL2A1, COL9A1, COL9A2, COL9A3, COL11A1, COL11A2, and AGC1. VDR and MMP-3 polymorphisms were also analysed. Sequence variations were tested in 56 Finnish controls.

RESULTS:

Several disease associated alleles were identified. A splice site mutation in COL9A2 leading to a premature translation termination codon and the generation of a truncated protein was identified in one proband, another had the Trp2 allele, and four others the Trp3 allele. The frequency of the COL11A2 IVS6(-4) t allele was 93.1% in the probands and 72.3% in controls (p = 0.0016). The differences in genotype frequencies for this site were less significant (p = 0.0043).

CONCLUSIONS:

Genetic factors have an important role in the pathogenesis of LSS.

PMID:
14644861
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1754404
Free PMC Article

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