Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
AAPS PharmSci. 2003;5(3):E24.

High glucose concentration in isotonic media alters caco-2 cell permeability.

Author information

  • 1Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

Abstract

Caco-2 cell permeability was evaluated in isotonic media containing high (25 mM) or physiological (5.5 mM) glucose concentrations. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and membrane fluidity were measured to assess glucose-induced alterations in physical barrier properties. In parallel, distribution of the actin filament (F-actin) and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) proteins was assessed by confocal microscopy. Transepithelial fluxes of mannitol, hydrocortisone, digoxin, and glycyl sarcosine (Gly-Sar) that permeate the intestinal mucosa by various pathways were measured to quantify the effect of glucose-induced changes on Caco-2 cell permeability. High glucose decreased maximum TEER of cell monolayers by 47%, whereas membrane fluidity at the hydrophobic core and lipid/polar head interphase was significantly increased. F-actin distribution in high glucose cells appeared more diffuse while ZO-1 was unchanged. Mannitol and hydrocortisone fluxes across Caco-2 cells cultured in high glucose increased by 65% and 24%, respectively. In addition, high glucose decreased the maximum transport capacity (Vmax) of PepT-1. P-glycoprotein activity, however, was unchanged. In conclusion, high extracellular glucose concentration in isotonic media significantly alters physical barrier properties of Caco-2 cell monolayers, which predominantly affects transepithelial transport of solutes permeating the cell barrier by paracellular and transcellular passive diffusion and facilitated transport mediated by the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter (PepT-1).

PMID:
14621959
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2750934
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk