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Sleep Med. 2001 Sep;2(5):389-96.

Comparison of actigraphic, polysomnographic, and subjective assessment of sleep parameters in sleep-disordered patients.

Author information

  • 1Stanford University Center of Excellence for Sleep Disorders, Stanford Sleep Disorders Clinic, 401 Quarry Road, Suite 3301, Stanford, CA 94305-5730, USA. clete@stanford.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Comparison of polysomnography (PSG)-derived sleep parameters (total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and number of awakenings) to those derived from actigraphy and subjective questionnaires.

BACKGROUND:

Actigraphy is commonly used to assist sleep specialists in the diagnosis of various sleep and circadian-rhythm disorders. However, few validation studies incorporate large sample sizes, typical sleep clinic patients, or comparisons with subjective reports of sleep parameters.

METHODS:

Clinical series with 100 consecutive sleep-disordered patients (69 men, 31 women, mean age of 49+/-14.7 years) at a tertiary sleep disorders center. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy measures were obtained from epoch-by-epoch comparison of PSG and actigraphic data. Subjective sleep parameter data were derived from questionnaires given to subjects in the morning following their recording night.

RESULTS:

We found that total sleep time and sleep efficiency did not significantly differ between PSG data and the combined data obtained from actigraphy and subjective reports. Using a high-threshold (low-wake-sensitivity) actigraphic algorithm, the number of awakenings was not significantly different from those detected by PSG.

CONCLUSIONS:

We recommend the use of subjective data as an adjunct to actigraphic data in estimating total sleep time and sleep efficiency in sleep-disordered patients, especially those with disorders of excessive somnolence.

PMID:
14592388
[PubMed]
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